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Some might say: “Are you not ashamed, Socrates, to have followed the kind of occupation that has led to your being now in danger of death?” However, I should be right to reply to him: “You are wrong, sir, if you think that a man who is any good at all should take into account the risk of life or death; he should look to this only in his actions, whether what he does is right or wrong, whether he is acting like a good or a bad man.” (28c)

This is the truth of the matter, gentlemen of the jury: whenever a man has taken a position that he believes to be best, or has been placed by his commander, there he must I think remain and face danger, without a thought for death or anything else, rather than disgrace. (28d)


Source

Plato. Five Dialogues (Apology).  Trans. G.M.A. Grube.  Hackett Publishing 1981. 


See Also

Lexicon Entries

La Mort 

Works and Days

 

Documents

 


Notes

 


Tags: Plato

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